Archivo por meses: mayo 2024

Inclusion for STEM, the institution, or minoritized youth? Exploring how educators navigate the discourses that shape social justice in informal science learning practices

[Visto: 66 veces]

Understanding equitable practice is crucial for science education since science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields and STEM learning practices remain significantly marked by structural inequalities. In this paper, building on theories of discourse and situated meaning developed by Foucault, Gee, and Sedgewick, we explore how educators navigated discourses about social justice in informal science learning (ISL) across four UK sites. We draw on qualitative, multimodal data across 5 years of a research–practice partnership between a university, a zoo, a social enterprise working to support girls and nonbinary youth in STEM, a community digital arts center, and a science center. We identify three key discourses that shaped social justice practices across all four practice–partner sites: (1) “inclusion” for STEM, (2) “inclusion” for the institution, and (3) “inclusion” for minoritized youth. We discuss how educators (n = 17) enacted, negotiated, resisted, and reworked these discourses to create equitable practice. We argue that while the three key discourses shaped the possible meanings and practices of equitable ISL in different ways, educators used their agency and creativity to develop more expansive visions of social justice. We discuss how the affordances, pitfalls, and contradictions that emerged within and between the three discourses were strategically navigated and disrupted by educators to support the minoritized youth they worked with, as well as to protect and promote equity in ISL. This paper contributes to research on social justice in ISL by grounding sometimes abstract questions about power and discourse in ISL educators’ everyday work.

 

Dawson, E., Bista, R., Colborne, A., McCubbin, B.-J., Godec, S., Patel, U., Archer, L., & Mau, A. (2024). Inclusion for STEM, the institution, or minoritized youth? Exploring how educators navigate the discourses that shape social justice in informal science learning practices. Science Education, 108, 792–819. https://doi.org/10.1002/sce.21856

 

Bridging Educational Change and Social Justice: A Call to the Field

[Visto: 23 veces]

Abstract

The education research community, both within the American Educational Research Association  (AERA) and beyond, could and should play a critical role in fundamentally transforming educational institutions and systems. Given its complexity, transformative change in education is best undertaken as a collective endeavor. Yet for researchers to be a valuable resource in educational transformation, we will need to bridge knowledge across subfields that currently have limited interaction. Through two illustrative examples, we demonstrate the need to link knowledge on educational change with knowledge on how to create more equitable, anti-racist, and decolonized spaces for formal and informal learning. While operating in different spaces and initiated at different entry points, the two change efforts exemplify a common set of commitments and actionable pathways for achieving transformational change. This article is a call to action for researchers to join together in supporting educational transformation that fundamentally challenges the inequitable arrangements persisting in educational organizations characterized by systemic racism and colonialism. Bridging knowledge bases and being accountable to serve and support communities and their intersectional identities are essential to making deep, scalable changes in education that promote social justice.
Datnow, A., Yoshisato, M., Macdonald, B., Trejos, J., & Kennedy, B. C. (2023). Bridging Educational Change and Social Justice: A Call to the Field. Educational Researcher52(1), 29-38. https://doi.org/10.3102/0013189X221138837

Combating school bullying through multi-role experience-based virtual scenario learning model: Assessing empathy, problem-solving, and self-efficacy from a multi-stakeholder perspective by Kai-Hsiang Yang * , Yi Lu

[Visto: 94 veces]

This study explores the applications of virtual scenario learning in addressing the global issue of
school bullying through digital educational tools. Previous research suggests that virtual roleplaying experiences can reduce bullying incidents; however, experiencing the victim role can evoke negative emotions, while the bystander role may not fully convey the severity of bullying.
This study aims to investigate the effects of a multi-role experience-based virtual scenario
learning model on learners by integrating the advantages of both roles. This study employed a
quasi-experimental research method, which involved grouping 56 fourth-grade elementary school students in Taipei City, Taiwan, into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group utilized the multi-role experience-based virtual scenario learning model, while the control group utilized a single-role experience-based model. The study compared the differences in academic achievement, empathy, and problem-solving tendencies between the two groups. The findings indicate that the experimental group significantly excelled over the control group in academic achievement, empathy, and problem-solving tendencies. The multi-role experiencebased virtual scenario learning model effectively nurtures students’ empathy and considerably enhances learners’ awareness of campus bullying.

The effect of serious game and problem-based learning on nursing students’ knowledge and clinical decision-making skill regarding the application of transfusion medicine in pediatric nursing by Ali Razaghpoor, M.Sc. in pediatric nursing a ,

[Visto: 53 veces]

Purpose: Comparing the effect of serious game and problem-based learning on nursing students’ knowledge and clinical decision-making skill regarding the application of transfusion medicine in pediatric nursing.
Design and methods: In this quasi-experimental study, 76 undergraduate nursing students were enrolled through a convenience sampling method, and were allocated to one of the three groups of serious game, problem-based  learning, and control through the block randomization method. Data were collected using a valid and reliable 3-part researcher-made tool, completed before and two weeks after the intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using paired t-test, analysis of covariance, and Bonferroni post hoc test. A significance level of <0.05 was considered.
Results: After the intervention, mean scores of both knowledge and clinical decision-making skill increased significantly in both intervention groups (p < 0.05). Mean post-test scores of both knowledge and clinical decision-making skill in the serious game group, and only clinical decision-making skill in the problem-based learning group were significantly higher than the control group (p < 0.05). However, no significant difference was observed regarding mean post-test scores of both knowledge and clinical decision-making skill between the intervention groups (p > 0.05).
Conclusions: Both serious game and problem-based learning are proven to be effective in improving nursing students’ knowledge and clinical decision-making skill regarding the application of transfusion medicine in pediatric nursing.
Practice implications: Since learning now occurs beyond classrooms and the new generation of students spend most of their time in virtual places, utilizing technology-based teaching methods like serious games can benefit both educators and students by providing continuous education, saving their time and expenses, etc

 

⁎ Corresponding author.
E-mail address: zahra_taheri@gums.ac.ir (Z. Taheri-Ezbarami)

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2024.01.010

Entrepreneurship education as first-person transformation: Interiority as an operationalizing mechanism by Kisito F. Nzembayie * , David Coghlan

[Visto: 44 veces]

The case for repositioning entrepreneurship education (EE) as first-person transformation in
classrooms envisioned as spaces for practical reasoning, has lately received significant scholarly
attention. This case aligns with a broader need to generate more impactful learning outcomes
that accurately reflect the nature of the entrepreneurship phenomenon. Notwithstanding, how a theory-praxis nexus results in first-person transformation remains underdeveloped. Accordingly, this paper advances interiority as an operationalizing mechanism for developing entrepreneurship as first-person transformation. Thus, we contribute to shifting the focus of learning from what we know, to how we know in a process of intellectual self-awareness. We then offer a conceptual framework that connects three realms of knowing: practical, relational, and theoretical, with interiority as the fulcrum. We discuss how this approach contributes to impactful entrepreneurial learning, seen through the emergence of entrepreneurial mindsets in reflective student practice

Corresponding author.
E-mail addresses: kfutonge@tcd.ie (K.F. Nzembayie), dcoghlan@tcd.ie (D. Coghlan).
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbvi.2024.e00471